3d

3D Design with Virtual Reality

This looks fun, entertaining, and where we will end up with 3D design tools. But the reality of standing for days at a time to create 3D designs tires me.

Car designers at Ford are using Gravity Sketch - a 3D virtual reality tool - to help speed up the vehicle design process. “This application has the potential to help ensure we are delivering the very best vehicle designs for our customers,” comments Smith. “It moves the entire process into the world of virtual reality, giving us greater options for reviewing more models in the 3D environment to create the best possible vehicles.”

McLaren Automotive works with software start-up, Vector Suite, to fast-track sportscar and supercar design

Interactive Volumetric Fog Display

SIGGRAPH Asia 2015 Emerging Technologies We present a novel 3D display that applies projection mapping to a non-planar and reconfigurable fog screen, thus enabling interactive visual contents to be displayed at multiple depth levels. Users can perceive three-dimensionality naturally and interact with the unencumbered images by touching them directly in mid-air. The display can also be used in mixed reality settings where physical objects can co-exist and interact with virtual objects in physical space in real time. It does not require special glasses, head-mounted devices or eye/head-tracking, while allowing high-resolution, full-color 3D image to be observed from wide viewing angles by many people at the same time. Most importantly, our immaterial, mid-air display will allow users to intuitively touch and manipulate virtual objects in 3D under marker-free and barrier-free settings, which will open up immense tangible and creative interaction possibilities.

Texturing of AR Characters from Colored Drawings

Coloring books capture the imagination of children and provide them with one of their earliest opportunities for creative expression. However, given the proliferation and popularity of digital devices, real-world activities like coloring can seem unexciting, and children become less engaged in them. Augmented reality holds unique potential to impact this situation by providing a bridge between real-world activities and digital enhancements. In this paper, we present an augmented reality coloring book App in which children color characters in a printed coloring book and inspect their work using a mobile device. The drawing is detected and tracked, and the video stream is augmented with an animated 3-D version of the character that is textured according to the child’s coloring. This is possible thanks to several novel technical contributions. We present a texturing process that applies the captured texture from a 2-D colored drawing to both the visible and occluded regions of a 3-D character in real time. We develop a deformable surface tracking method designed for colored drawings that uses a new outlier rejection algorithm for real-time tracking and surface deformation recovery. We present a content creation pipeline to efficiently create the 2-D and 3-D content. And, finally, we validate our work with two user studies that examine the quality of our texturing algorithm and the overall App experience.

Brilliant Cube is a kinetic 3D matrix

Brilliant Cube is a kinetic 3D matrix, comprised of 576 clear LED poles moving up and down. The dimension is 6M X 6M X 6M. It is located at Gangnam station crossroads, one of the most crowded spots in Seoul being a new landmark of Gangnam. With the theme of "Live Brilliant" each LED stands for the brilliant moment of our lives, and by the structure this shows the frameworks of our time that implies the social shift of each individual with equal capacity tiered in the same distance and depth. Brilliant Cube, created by a renowned media artist Jin-Yo Mok, in collaboration with Seoul based media artist group: Jonpasang, is not only a kinetic sculpture, but a medium for various messages. This installation is supported by Hyundai Motor Company and Gangnam Gu.

Dancer Bends Light in Projection-Mapped Performance

Inside a cube fashioned from translucent veils, a dancer takes a visual journey into a 3D space between dreams and reality. Hakanaï is a digital solo performance from Adrien M / Claire B that made its debut at BAM’s Fishman Theatre on March 17, 2015. The choreographed performance installation combines video projection mapping, CGI, and sensors to dynamically respond to the movements and proximity of its performer. Its visuals and sounds are generated and animated live, offering a uniquely different performance for each and every iteration.

World’s First 3D-Printed Car

It took 44 hours to manufacture, and has 49 parts. 
The car, known as the Strati, is perhaps the world’s fully drivable, almost completely 3D printer-manufactured automobile. Local Motors used crowd-sourced design and a custom-built 3D printer to create the one-of-a-kind (for now) 3D printed car and assembled it over six days at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) in Chicago, Illinois a few weeks ago.

The all-gray Strati is somewhat larger than I expected. It sits low to the ground like a race car and features just two custom leather seats. On parts of the body, you can clearly see the printed layers, in others, the Strati has been milled to smooth perfection. The body feels, well, like plastic, but also extremely solid. It has race-car lines, but also a custom-built quality. Rogers tells me that there are 227 printed layers in the chassis and the only limit was the 3D printer. Eventually, Local Motors expects to use larger 3D printers to print even bigger cars (can you say “3D-printed SUV?).

The 3D-printed car is going to change the way car manufacturers create vehicles. By cutting down the time and cost to build cars, Local Motors has shown the automotive world that things need to change. This line of vehicle is the catalyst, and you can be the first to own it.

 

 

Women Walks Again with Exoskeleton

In 1992, Amanda Boxtel suffered a vicious skiing accident that left her paralyzed from the waist down. Doctors said she would never walk again. This week, she proved them wrong, with the help of the world's first 3D printed exoskeleton that gives her the ability to climb out of her wheelchair and walk once again.

The Ekso-Suit Amanda wears is fully bespoke. 3D Systems used data from a full body scan to print custom-tailored pieces that fit exactly to Amanda's body. Mechanical components from EksoBionics provide the automation, allowing Amanda to safely use her legs and a pair of canes to walk around.

3D scanning and printing technologies were crucial to making Amanda's exoskeleton, which took roughly 3 months to complete. As Scott Summit, senior director for functional design at 3D Systems, told Cnet, "we had to be very specific with the design so we never had 3D-printed parts bumping into bony prominences, which can lead to abrasions." Since Amanda has no sensation in her legs, even tiny skin injuries can become dangerously infected before they're found. A comfortable fit isn't just a nicety, it's a safety necessity.

This exoskeleton is the first to use 3D printing for an individualized fit, but it's not Amanda's first time using such technology: in 2010, she helped test an earlier exoskeleton design to help paralyzed patients walk again. Since then, she's been active as one of ten EksoBionics test pilots involved in the design process. Keep reading at http://bit.ly/1gwvSTl

Mobile Projection Mapping

Castol (Geometry Johannesburg) commissioned us to create a mobile mapping experience that they could take around the country to educate their market about their products. The solution was to create a projection mapped cinema in the back of a truck for a fully immersive experience. We mapped 3 different cars that rotate into position and represent the 3 main oils that Castrol create.

Gravity - 3D Sketching. Gravity is a tool for creatives to quickly sketch their ideas in 3D space using immersive augmented reality. A pen and a pad specifically designed for sketching in the augmented environment. Free from any screen or computer, Gravity allows you to focus on what really matters, developing your ideas in an intuitive way. As you start to draw, objects will take shape in front of you. Through the landing pad controls, you can adjust the plane in which you sketch, giving volume to your creation. With augmented reality glasses, Gravity reinvents how you and your collaborators visualize and contribute to each other’s ideas. The project started with a strong belief: the tools that are commonly used for drawing, designing and making things in 3D limit people’s ability to bring their ideas to reality. Through numerous prototypes, tests and iterations, we created Gravity as a simple and engaging tool that will shape a new wave of 3D creation. Source

Scientists Create 3D Printed Heart Membrane That Can Keep Heart Beating Perfectly Forever. This video shows a rabbit heart that has been kept beating outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution. The new cardiac device — a thin, stretchable membrane imprinted with a spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes — is custom-designed to fit over the heart and contract and expand with it as it beats. Source

Ocean Park Jelly Fish Pavilion Interactive Projection. Making use of Unity3D engine, Fatty successfully brings interactivity onto 3D stage to take a closer look the one of the most beautiful creatures in the world.

Apart from more realistic and splendid visual quality, it also applies better physic simulation to each of the 16 Sea Jelly.

Museum visitors can learn about the properties of the Sea Jelly with the two mutli-touch screens installed in the middle of an 8m x 2.5m projection. In the meanwhile you clicked on the screen, a huge version of your selected sea jelly will swim up on the projection, letting you look at them in real close.

Artificial Organs May Finally Get a Blood Supply

Artificial tissue has always lacked a key ingredient: blood vessels. A new 3-D printing technique seems poised to change that.

vascularized tissue

Living layers: Harvard researchers demonstrate their method for creating vascularized tissue constructs by printing cell-laden inks in a layered zig-zag pattern.

In what may be a critical breakthrough for creating artificial organs, Harvard researchers say they have created tissue interlaced with blood vessels.

Using a custom-built four-head 3-D printer and a “disappearing” ink, materials scientist Jennifer Lewisand her team created a patch of tissue containing skin cells and biological structural material interwoven with blood-vessel-like structures.Reported by the team in Advanced Materials, the tissue is the first made through 3-D printing to include potentially functional blood vessels embedded among multiple, patterned cell types.

In recent years, researchers have made impressive progress in building tissues and organ-like structures in the lab. Thin artificial tissues, such as a trachea grown from a patient’s own cells, are already being used to treat patients (see “Manufacturing Organs”). In other more preliminary examples, scientists have shown that specific culture conditions can push stem cells to grow into self-organized structures resembling a developing brain, a bit of a liver, or part of an eye (see “Researchers Grow 3-D Human Brain Tissues,” “A Rudimentary Liver Is Grown from Stem Cells,” and “Growing Eyeballs”). But no matter the method of construction, all regenerative projects have run up against the same wall when trying to build thicker and more complex tissues: a lack of blood vessels.

Lewis’s group solved the problem by creating hollow, tube-like structures within a mesh of printed cells using an “ink” that liquefies as it cools. The tissue is built by the 3-D printer in layers. A gelatin-based ink acts as extracellular matrix—the structural mix of proteins and other biological molecules that surrounds cells in the body. Two other inks contained the gelatin material and either mouse or human skin cells. All these inks are viscous enough to maintain their structure after being laid down by the printer.

A third ink with counterintuitive behavior helped the team create the hollow tubes. This ink has a Jell-O-like consistency at room temperature, but when cooled it liquefies. The team printed tracks of this ink amongst the others. After chilling the patch of printed tissue, the researchers applied a light vacuum to remove the special ink, leaving behind empty channels within the structure. Then cells that normally line blood vessels in the body can be infused into the channels.

The smallest channels printed were about 75 micrometers in diameter, which is much larger than the tiny capillaries that exchange nutrients and waste throughout the body. The hope is that the 3-D printing method will set the overall architecture of blood vessels within artificial tissue and then smaller blood vessels will develop along with the rest of the tissue. “We view this as a method to print the larger vessels; then we want to harness biology to do the rest of the work,” says Lewis

Source

Sensebellum @ The Capitol Hill Block Party 2013. Returning to the urban theatre centered around 10th and Pike on Capitol Hill just outside of downtown Seattle was something we look forward to each year here at Sensebellum - this is The Capitol Hill Block Party. Building off of the last year’s experience, it was thought best to really fill out the space and expand the architecture with a live video feed from the stage mixed with tight fitting 3D animations across 2 buildings and 4 stories. See what happens when you mix 6 city blocks, the senses, 15,000+ people, 100+ bands, and our new media techniques in this summer blockbuster video recap. Source

All of the frames were shot using Canon 500D and EFS 18-200 f/3.5-5.6 with 5 to 10 seconds of interval. I hope that I can improve the technique from this exercise, and I’m planning to do another time lapse project for Vivid 2014. Vivid Sydney is an annual light festival that are held in several places throughout Sydney CBD during winter. From 6 PM until midnight, famous tourist attractions in Darling Harbour and Circular Quay are transformed into spectacular light installations, some of them are also interactive. The iconic Sydney Opera House, Museum Of Contemporary Art, and Customs House are transformed into a giant canvas, where artists use video mapping projections to make the buildings ‘alive’. Dancing fountains are also installed in Darling Harbour, which occurs every hour. Source